Feminism has fostered an increasingly broad dialogue, says Rosa Beltrán

Guadalajara (Mexico, Nov 27 (EFE)) .- Feminism has made all sectors of society begin to talk about violence and how it affects any area of ​​life, the Mexican writer said this Saturday in an interview with Efe. Rosa Beltrán prior to the presentation of her new book at the Guadalajara International Book Fair (FIL).

“What feminism is doing is making the problem visible, naming it and it is a first step. This is being seen more and more, although not everyone wants it, in a collective conversation, in something that matters to all of us, not only women and that it is important to change to make this world more livable, “said Beltrán.

For the writer, the work of feminist organizations in Mexico and Latin America have opened important spaces and will continue to take more and more lands and spaces in which it was previously difficult to speak.

“The questioning is not going to stop, I do not think it will be easy, but it is a path that no longer has a return, but for the better, it is one of the changes in which we can still hope,” he said.

TELL THE FAMILY STORY

Beltrán (Mexico City, 1960) premieres “Free Radicals” at the Mexican FIL, a novel in which he tells the story of three generations of women over 60 years who try to free themselves from the stigmas of what the feminine should be , while discovering their sexuality and their own body.

The book, which took him three years to finalize and which emerged in the months of isolation of 2020, attempts to address from the intimacy of a family how women and feminism have changed along with a country in which violence against them has been reiterated in different ways and from different trenches.

The author outlines these changes from the mother of the protagonist who decides to use oral contraceptives for the first time and maintains clear political ideas, a social and personal life to a girl who is part of the generation of the #MeToo complaint movement and have different ways of Political activism.

Beltrán, a member of the Mexican Academy of Language, assures that he wanted to “embrace” the different feminisms that have given life to this social and political movement and how it has been transformed along with the changes in a country with the concept of family as entrenched and with as much violence as Mexico is.

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