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They warn that the drinking water of a Canadian city may be contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons

The city of Iqaluit in the territory of Nunavut (Canada) has declared a state of emergency after finding evidence of gasoline in water supplies, they reported local media.

It’s a statement published The government of Nunavut reported evidence of contamination of petroleum hydrocarbons, or combustible chemicals, in the treated water of Iqaluit.

The City Health Department issued a notice of do not consume tap water for drinking or cooking, even if it is filtered or boiled, until new notice. He also warned that newborns and babies should not be bathed with this water, but older residents can continue to use it for showering and cleaning.

The announcement comes days after the city received complaints about a fuel smell coming from residents’ taps.

Meanwhile, Nunavut authorities said they were conducting additional testing of the city’s drinking water for petroleum hydrocarbons and that test results are expected next week.

Likewise, the mayor of the city, Kenny Bell, communicated that the government of the territory is working to help Iqaluit with its water emergency crisis by transporting around 80,000 liters of water for three days.

On the other hand, the concern of almost 8,000 residents of the affected area grows and they have started buying bottled water, which can cost almost $ 9 a liter in the city.

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