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Filtering 1000 kilograms of CO2 from the air creates 300 kilograms of new CO2

A pilot system from the Swiss manufacturer Climeworks has been using chemical filters to bind 900 tons of CO annually since 20172 from the atmosphere in Hilwil near Zurich. However, this process requires the use of energy and a sorbent, and ultimately you have to remove the filtered CO2 Transport away and save. In a study Researchers from the University of Freiburg and the Berlin climate research institute MCC (Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change) have now carefully examined the resource consumption of such a system.

With the TSA method (temperature change adsorption) used, fans suck the ambient air through porous filter material. In a second process step, the system heats the filter materials to remove the CO2 trigger again and save. These processes require each ton of CO2 around 1000 kilowatt hours of energy. In addition, 36 kilograms of material are used, seven tons of the sorbent, which consists of porous granules with an amine coating, and three cubic meters of water.

The researchers also took into account the effort involved in setting up and later demolishing the facility and, in particular, the resulting fine dust emissions. Per ton of CO degraded2Pollution resulted in another 180 grams of fine dust emissions. Around 900 tons of CO2 To filter out, the plant takes up 11,000 square meters of space for one year.

The aim of the researchers is to use their calculations to make the technologies of different air filter systems comparable. The bottom line was that they demonstrated that the type of system examined was able to produce one ton of filtered CO2 again 300 kilograms of CO2-Equivalents caused. In addition, the CO removed from the ambient air2 is not broken down chemically, but is to be stored in underground caverns, for example, in order to permanently withdraw it from the atmosphere.


(agr)

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